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Causal Conjunctions

What is a causal conjunction?

A causal conjunction is a word or phrase that introduces an explanation or reason for an action within a sentence.


Causal conjunction examples

Causal conjunctions can be coordinating conjunctions, subordinating conjunctions or adverbs/adverbials. Here are some examples of each:

Coordinating conjunctions

so

yet

Subordinating conjunctions

as

because

even though

since

Adverbs/Adverbials

as a result

consequently

therefore

 


Using causal conjunctions in a sentence

Causal conjunctions link two clauses. They can be used in the middle of a sentence:

 

The heating system is broken so it is very cold in the house.

I am wearing my raincoat because it looks like it is going to rain.

She could not continue to play in the match as a result of her injuries.

 

If a causal conjunction is a subordinating conjunction, it can also be placed at the beginning of the sentence:

 

I am still hungry even though I had a large bowl of pasta for dinner.

Even though I had a large bowl of pasta for dinner, I am still hungry.

When a subordinate conjunction is at the beginning of the sentence, a comma must be placed after the subordinate clause that follows it.

 

Causal conjunctions that are adverbs or adverbials can also be used to refer to a sentence before the one in which it is used:

 

I knocked the vase off the table. Consequently, it smashed.

Harry missed lunch. As a result, he is very hungry.

If an adverbial is used at the beginning of the sentence, a comma must be placed after it.


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