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Square numbers diagram 1x1 to 6x6

Square Numbers

Download a FREE poster showing all the square numbers to 100!

What are square numbers?

A square number is the product of a number multiplied by itself. 


In maths, the word ‘product’ means the result of one or more multiplications. For example, in the number sentence, axb=c (a multiplied by b equals c), c is the product of the equation. 


Square numbers include 1, 4, 9, 16 and 25, because 

1x1=1

2x2=4

3x3=9

4x4=16

5x5=25 

… and so on!


Why are square numbers called square numbers?

Square numbers are called square numbers (or squared numbers) because they form the area of a square. The sides are an equal number of units in length so they make a square. 

 

Squared numbers illustrated squares 1x1 to 6x6
A diagram showing 12 to 62

Here is a list of all the square numbers to 100:

Number

Square

Square roots

1

1

1x1

2

4

2x2

3

9

3x3

4

16

4x4

5

25

5x5

6

36

6x6

7

49

7x7

8

46

8x8

9

81

9x9

10

100

10x10


 

Try covering one of the columns, can you fill in the missing numbers?

Can you work out the squared numbers up to 1000?


Download this free handy 100 square showing all the square numbers to 100

 

Is there a quick way to write a number squared?

Yes! Numbers that are going to be squared are often written with a little 2 after them.

12means 1x1 so 12 = 1

22 means 2x2 so 22 = 4

32 means 3x3 so 32 = 9

42 means 4x4 so 42 = 16

52 means 5x5 so 52 = 25

 

When are square numbers taught in the English National Curriculum?

In the English National Curriculum squared numbers are introduced to children in Year 5. They build on their knowledge of multiplication and division by learning the notations for squared and cubed. They then use this knowledge to solve problems. 


You can find all our Maths schemes of work featuring squared numbers by using our objective checker. 





Teach your Year 5’s about Squares, Cubes, and Factors. During this five-lesson series, your class will learn how to identify and use squared and cubed numbers, as well as how to find factor pairs. They will find factor pairs using divisibility tests to identify factors of larger numbers. 

 

Revisit the children’s understanding of square and cube numbers in the context of area and volume with our Primes, Squares, and Cubes series of lessons. Then move on to explore the definition of prime and composite numbers and their properties.


If you are looking for other primary school maths lessons make sure you have a look at our collection of maths packs, which are designed to give you full coverage of the national curriculum. 


If you are looking for some free resources to support your maths teaching, look no further! We have stacks of printable free maths resources and an informative cube number blog ready and waiting for you.
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